Commercial Condition Reports

 Condition Reports

Cables are usually hidden inside our walls, and consumer units are often hidden in cupboards, so it is not surprising that we forget to check the condition of our electrical installation for damage or wear and tear.

All electrical installations deteriorate with age and use. They should therefore be inspected and tested at regular intervals to check whether they are in a satisfactory condition for continued use. Such safety checks are commonly referred to as ‘periodic inspection and testing’.

Once completed you will be issued with an Electrical Condition Report (EICR)

View Case Study

Who needs an EICR?

Although for privately owned domestic properties it is not a statutory requirement to have an EICR performed on the electrical installation, it is advisable that the electrical installation of all properties are tested and inspected at regular intervals and no longer than once every ten years.

For privately rented properties it might not be a statutory requirement, although that is dependent on the area that you live in – further information. It is important to ensure that all electrical appliances and fittings within the property are safe and in good working order, as you can still be held liable if there is an injury caused by an unsafe electrical installation.

For a House of Multiple Occupancy or an HMO, it has been a statutory requirement for over five years; it states that the building management should;

 ‘ensures that every fixed electrical installation is inspected and tested at intervals not exceeding five years by a person qualified to undertake such inspection and testing’

It is a statutory requirement that commercial properties and properties where the public have access; are regularly checked and that an EICR is perform on the electrical services. The period between inspections is determined by the function and the use of the building.

View Case Study

How often is a periodic inspection required?

Your electrics should be inspected and tested every:

  • 10 years for an owner-occupied home.
  • 5 years for a rented home.
  • 3 years for a caravan.
  • 1 year for a swimming pool.

Other times when a periodic inspection should be carried out are:

  • When a property is being prepared for letting.
  • Before selling a property or buying a previously-occupied property.

View Case Study

What is the aim of a condition report?

The five main aims of a condition report are:

  1. Record the results of the inspection and testing to make sure the electrical installation is safe to be used until the next inspection (following any work needed to make it safe)
  2. Find any damage and wear and tear that might affect safety, and report it
  3. Find any parts of the electrical installation that do not meet the IEE Wiring Regulations
  4. Help find anything that may cause electric shocks and high temperatures
  5. Provide an important record of the installation at the time of the inspection, and for inspection testing in the future.

View Case Study

Types of condition report & non-compliance codes

In general, there are two types of domestic electrical installation condition report:

  • Visual condition report – this does not include testing and is only suitable if the installation has been testing recently.
  • Periodic inspection reports – this is what we would normally recommend, as it tests the installation and would find any hidden damage.

The codes used to determine whether there are non-compliances or issue with the electrical installation and are numbered C1 to C3. These codes will be entered on the Electrical Installation Condition Report, along with a description of the nature of the fault, and will determine whether a ‘Satisfactory’ or ‘Unsatisfactory’ report will be applied to the installation.

  • Code C1 ‘Danger present’: There is a risk of injury and that immediate remedial action is required to remove the dangerous condition.
  • Code C2 ‘Potentially dangerous condition’: Urgent remedial action required, this should declare the nature of the problem, not the remedial actions required.
  • Code C3 ‘Improvement recommended’ This code more often than not implies that while the installation may not comply with the current set of regulations, complies with a previous set of regulations and so is deemed to be safe although this safety can be improved upon.

View Case Study